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IAP/IAMP Statement on Antimicrobial Resistance: A Call for Action

  • AuthorIAP/IAMP
  • TitleAntimicrobial Resistance: A Call for Action
  • Release Date18 Nov 2013
  • Copyright2013
  • File info Download Report
    (PDF, 704KB)

IAP-IAMP logosAlthough there have been major advances in research into, and treatment of, many communicable diseases, continuing progress in tackling these major challenges for public health is threatened by the dramatic increase in the number and distribution worldwide of pathogens resistant to antimicrobial (antibacterial, antiviral, antiparasitic and antifungal) drugs. For example, a recent report by the UK Chief Medical Officer concludes that “antimicrobial resistance poses catastrophic threat”.

The latest G8 Science Ministers Statement (2013) focused on the global challenge of antimicrobial resistance and the World Health Organisation expressed concern that this rapidly growing problem may impede progress towards the Millennium Development Goals 20152. The global pandemic of antibiotic resistance in both community care and hospital-associated infections represents a major health and economic burden and this crisis is being exacerbated by a relative lack of innovation in generating new antibiotics: we are in danger of returning to a pre-antibiotic era.

The Lancet Global Health publishes "What do we need to do to tackle antimicrobial resistance" - a Commentary on the IAP/IAMP Statement today, 18 November 2013.

Comments:
  • Peter McGrath
    Peter McGrath said:
    2 years and 2 months ago
    EASAC has sent a version of the following email to MEPs on the European Parliament’s Committee on the Environment, Public Health and Food Safety (ENVI).

    At EASAC, we welcome the work by the ENVI Committee on antimicrobial resistance in their draft report on ‘Safer healthcare in Europe: Improving Patient Safety and Fighting Antimicrobial Resistance’.

    It is vital to develop the critical mass in Europe to support and generate good new science, dismantle the bureaucratic obstacles to using the outputs from that science, and ensure that innovation can be sustained in the longer term.

    As the ENVI Committee considers this report, and before amendments are tabled by 4 March, EASAC is sending this message to MEPs on the ENVI Committee to draw their attention to EASAC’s recommendations on antimicrobial resistance as detailed in our recent statement:

    Support for basic research through European Commission and Member State funding agencies.
    Support for new compound identification and development.
    Addressing the bottlenecks in preclinical and early clinical development, including through additional public funding, enabling clinical researchers to develop their skills in infectious disease research, and international collaboration – particularly with the US National Institutes of Health.
    Optimising EU partnerships between academia and the pharmaceutical industry, and different Member States.
    Rethinking regulatory frameworks, such as harmonising regulatory requirements for the registration of new drugs.
    Raising public awareness of the threat of antimicrobial resistance, the prudent use of antibiotics, the need to support research and innovation (including animal research), and the possible limitations of new therapies.

    It is also essential to recognise that antimicrobial resistance is a global problem: we would draw your attention to a recent editorial in the WHO Bulletin that calls for action, in particular an international legal framework, to encompass the issues of access, conservation and innovation.

    EASAC – the European Academies' Science Advisory Council – is formed by the national science academies of the EU Member States to enable them to collaborate with each other in providing independent science advice to European policy-makers. It thus provides a means for the collective voice of European science to be heard.
    Like 0
  • Peter McGrath
    Peter McGrath said:
    2 years and 2 months ago
    Interesting paper published by two Swedish authors in the Journal of Science Communication, JComm:
    Is it my responsibility or theirs? Risk communication about antibiotic resistance in the Swedish daily press
    Like 0
  • Peter McGrath
    Peter McGrath said:
    2 years and 4 months ago
    European Academies Science Advisory Council (EASAC) releases a statement on 'Antimicrobial Drug Discovery: Greater steps ahead'.

    In this Statement, EASAC builds on a long-standing interest in the opportunities and challenges associated with tackling infectious diseases to re-examine the current situation, to consider how to search for new scientific directions for antimicrobial innovation and to remove impediments in translating research advances to drug development.

    Read more ...
    Resources:

    [Resource]

    Antimicrobial drug discovery: greater steps ahead

    In this Statement, EASAC builds on a long-standing interest in the opportunities and challenges associated with tackling infectious diseases to re-examine the current situation, to consider how to search for new scientific directions for antimicrobial innovation and to remove impediments in translating research advances to drug development.

    Like 0
  • Peter McGrath
    Peter McGrath said:
    2 years and 4 months ago
    Antibiotics: US discovery labelled 'game-changer' for medicine

    The decades-long drought in antibiotic discovery could be over after a breakthrough by US scientists.

    Their novel method for growing bacteria has yielded 25 new antibiotics, with one deemed "very promising".

    Read more ...
    Like 0
  • Peter McGrath
    Peter McGrath said:
    2 years and 7 months ago
    US National Academies release "Antimicrobial Resistance: A problem without borders".
    Resources:
    Like 0
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